Sunday, January 17, 2010


So, as I might have mentioned, I read Soulless by Gail Carriger on my little journey across the pond. I enjoyed it immensely, and the only reason I wasn't finished with it by the time I got to the apartment was the last eight hours of the journey I was so cross eyed from lack of sleep I could hardly make out my seat number on my boarding pass, let alone read a novel.

I first heard about this book because Ms. Cariger guest-spots on Brass Needles, a highly enjoyable sci-fi/knitting podcast that I subscribe to. I filed it away in the back of my mind, but then a few weeks ago I was over on Charlaine Harris' blog, where she has posted her review, and went, "Oh! I was going to read that!" A few days later I looked it up in Borders and brought it home, then tucked it away in my carry on to save for the plane.

Since I'm reading all of these books, I figured that it's only right I should give you a run down and my opinions of my favorites. So I'll start today with Soulless (and no, I have not forgotten my promised Urban Shaman review. I'll get there later this week. I hope).

The book combines some of my favorite things: Victorian London society, vampires, werewolves, a good mystery, romance...and of course, because this is me, it's funny. Though she would probably tell you differently, the main character, Alexia, has a wicked sense of humor. She's very sarcastic in her observations of the people around her, which is right up my alley.

At twenty-six, she's already been put on the shelf as a spinster thanks to her Italian heritage. Add to that her soulless state, and out the window go all chances of finding a husband in the conventional way. Instead, she's stuck with a silly family that can't see beyond their own noses, and an irritable, government employed werewolf, Earl Connell Maccon, a brutish Scotsman, and her only real pleasures in life come from teasing her best friend Ivy about her poor hat choices, and the eclectic library her dead father left behind.

Still, things are going along reasonably smoothly until she's attacked out of the blue by a vampire at a party. Now everyone thinks that she's behind the strange happenings that are being swept under the rug--like missing werewolves and rogue vampires that keep popping up out of nowhere, and of all people she has to depend on Lord Maccon to sort it all out. Throw in gay vampires and secret societies, plus tea with the Queen, and you've got a recipe for a fantastic steampunk adventure.

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